The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki II screenshots
posted on 01.27.14 at 01:13 AM EDT by (@salromano)
First game being localized in traditional Chinese and Korean.

The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki II

Falcom has shared four new screenshots and the direct-feed logo for The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki II.

Additionally, Falcom announced it has signed with Sony Computer Entertainment Asia to localize the first game, The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki, into traditional Chinese and Korean in summer 2014. In addition, the Asian localized version of Sen no Kiseki II will be released at the same time as the Japanese language version.

View the new screenshots at the gallery.

Play-Asia
  • equalequation

    I’d be happier if they’d just also release the Japanese language edition of the Kiseki games in general into Asian PSN stores too. :/ Not all of us read Chinese/Korean, Falcom! Other companies do this, why not you? I’d love to buy a digital version and support my region instead of having to import the physical disc!

    • JeremyTMH

      Shouldnt it be better to import the physical version? O_o

      More collection value if you ask me but not for me to judge individual priorities I guess. I mean some asian countries have anal import laws or customs. :/

      • equalequation

        My country has anal customs & taxes, yeah. The last time I had to take all the three hours trip to clear customs for a game was pretty aaaaaaaaargh. Usually it’s just annoyingly high tax rates (it’s usually cheaper to buy from PSN), but sometimes some jerk in custom decides to detain software for whatever reason. :/

        I do have all the Falcom games in physical copies since their PC days, though, so I guess at least I’d be continuing on building my collection like you said. Silver lining!

        • JeremyTMH

          I never had a problem with EMS but maybe its just my country. Oh its nice to see a fellow collector lol.

  • AlphaSixNine

    English speaking Asians left out once again. Damn it Sony.

    • JeremyTMH

      Not really, I picked up japanese as my 3rd language long ago because I lost faith in English Localisations (well not all of them…)

      • DrForbidden

        I think AlphaSixNine is referring to the Asians who aren’t also versed in Japanese, Chinese, or Korean. It’s hardly necessary to point out that those who can manage Japanese would have no problems whatsoever even with a Japanese-only release.

        • JeremyTMH

          I know. But look at it this way, rather than complaining, I think its better to be proactive and pick upa language that matches interests rather than rely on other people.

          I gave up on localizations in english a long time ago because I got sick of waiting. Also got sick of cultural differences resulting in changes when a Japanese game is localised for a western audience, or worse, censorship.

          Ultimately its up to the person. Rely on a game getting released in your language, or take the fight to them and pick up the language. I do not regret picking up Japanese, not only for my interests, but in relation even to my work.

          Also certain parts of Asia we have a certain benefit most westerners don’t, we already have to learn our mother tounge as a 2nd language for our education, as well as English, so we have a habit or more like, the experience of learning more than 1 language.

          • DrForbidden

            It is true that it’s never a bad thing to learn a new language, but that is not always an option for some people. Depending on where you live, it is often not possible to get a good teacher or someone to practice with, and doing it yourself can be extremely difficult, not to mention that there will be nobody to correct your mistakes. There are also constraints of time, and whether it is a better use of one’s time to spend it learning a language you may never use outside of your hobby, than to spend it with your loved ones or working or studying or whatever. Not to mention that it can often take several years to become sufficiently proficient in a new language.

            It’s a noble sentiment, and certainly I would encourage anyone to do so, but people come from all sorts of background and viability may be an issue.

            • JeremyTMH

              Well to be fair, if people can afford to buy a PS3 or PSV to play the game, they sure can afford internet to learn Japanese. A lot of very basic material can be found to start basic reading.

              Of course as you said, time, commitment and priorities.

              • Budgiecat

                Its a nice sentiment and gesture but maybe these publishers need to stop being douchebags and start thinking more on a global scale. More money in their pocket instead of this archaic Galapagos syndrome mentality which is just plain retarded. A lot of Japanese developers closed up shop and died because of this defeatist nationalistic attitude that sucks donkey dick

          • PrinceHeir

            “I know. But look at it this way, rather than complaining, I think its better to be proactive and pick upa language that matches interests rather than rely on other people.”

            so true!

            that’s what i’m doing now! shame i didn’t realize it until it was too late.

            welp better late than never i guess ^^

          • Budgiecat

            Seems like Asian version Freedom Wars has an English option.

            The best option is to bridge the stupid fucking gap we have as consumers to publishers who are out of touch and dont have a fucking clue. Stupid fucking assholes

  • https://twitter.com/RyoonZ RyoonZ

    Yeah, my Chinese knowledge is useful at last!!!

    • https://twitter.com/GaleGlory89 KiQun

      The same for me. Though I would prefer English, but damned …. beggar can’t be chooser.

    • http://twitter.com/RaiuLyn Raiu

      The benefits of being multilingual…. :D

  • crimsonidol

    Additionally, Falcom announced it has signed with Sony Computer Entertainment Europe/America to localize the first game, The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki, into English in summer 2014. In addition, the English localized version of Sen no Kiseki II will be released at the same time as the Japanese language version and Sony clarified that they will release the game as a physicial version

    ^ Should read like this. Why chinese and korean and not english? ;__;

    • SageShinigami

      They still have to get through SC and TC, then the Vita games before they can do this.

      • Budgiecat

        lame tired excuse

    • Altin

      Because of you, I have to use much Burn Heal right now.

  • PrinceHeir

    i hope SCEA steps up the plate and localize this.

    instead of using the funds to make another franchise, they really need to boost the Vita sales here ad make the series known outside of Japan.

    killing two birds in one stone :P

  • Duc PC-QB

    Falcom announced it has signed with SCE Asia to localize the first game.

    RIP SCEA SCEE

    • Gariya

      Believe in Adam Boyes.

  • Kami nii

    I’m an Asian an English speaking one and I really find this offensive maybe its just me but saying that “Sony Computer Entertainment Asia” branch localizing a game but it is still ignoring other asian countries who have eng as an international language is just a slap in the face. No offense but really why ignore us?At least localize an asian version that has eng text

    EDIT: better yet localize the first game first!

    • DrForbidden

      Because like all them racist companies, Sony thinks that Asians are all Chinese, Japanese, or Korean.

      That’s a joke.

      I think the real reason is that English localisation priorities are always assigned to European or US branches/companies. I’m not sure why this is so, but it seems that unless a game is scheduled for US/Eu release, English localisations won’t be announced. It’s probably got to do with licensing and legal issues, but I don’t have any clearer ideas than that.

      • JeremyTMH

        Not only that, all rpevious Kiseki games already had Chinese releases (and Korean I think).

        They have no backlog unlike the Eng side.

      • Kami nii

        You know what really bugs me is that these companies don’t have the balls to take risk, I know it sounds stupid but why not try opening up to the WEST? and even if they do what?the game is release in 2014 the English version is 2020 WTF?!

        • Budgiecat

          Pretty much. Japanese companies on the whole play it way too safe. It’s frustrating to say the least..

  • dior

    looks good

  • almostautumn

    Le sigh. There really are great console JRPGs out there— but we, in America, get Neptunia instead.
    What a waste.

    • Gariya

      “There really are great console JRPGs out there— but we, in America, get one of them”.
      “What a waste.”

      I don’t understand.

      • TreizeX

        Neptunia isn’t that good. Hell, it’s pretty boring

        Then again, it’s just my opinion. I don’t like most of Compile hearts games anyways

        • Budgiecat

          Dont worry because its pretty much true.

  • jujubee88

    About time there be a partnership with Falcom and Sony. I always thought Falcom as being a great, underrated JRPG dev so I’m glad Sony is doing this.

    • Gariya

      Falcom is THE studio that inspired Enix to make Dragon Quest, and to an extend, Square to make Final Fantasy(though somehow Falcom keep being in the shadow while Square Enix ended up as a big shot).

      Now that FF is a multiplat available to Xbox, SCE has to get close to the trigger of JRPG genre to get more exclusive support.

  • Articuno76

    So how come the Chinese versions of these game can be translated and ready for simultaneous release but the English versions are years away?

    Like I get there is some similarity between the two because of the Chinese characters but from what I’ve heard Chinese is closer grammatically to English than Japanese.

    • Budgiecat

      Because they’re stoopid

    • almostautumn

      Because Asian territorities have a far greater JRPG consumer-base than the west. It has nothing to do with costs of localization, but rather the statistical profit margin that will follow localization. In the west there isn’t a safe-bet for such a thing, but Eastern territories are far more friendly and enthusiastic towards the genre, and have a significantly higher percentage of buying the game ON RELEASE than in the west.

      • Budgiecat

        And that is directly the result of poor marketing and publishing from these companies. There are no absolutes. Don’t expect miracles when you fucking half ass something…

      • Articuno76

        Ah, that makes sense. I wasn’t aware the games sold that well in Asia.

  • http://twitter.com/RaiuLyn Raiu

    “Additionally, Falcom announced it has signed with Sony Computer Entertainment Asia to localize the first game, The Legend of Heroes: Sen no Kiseki, into traditional Chinese”

    *Grinning like an idiot*
    Would have prefer simplified Chinese but I can’t complain much at this point…. :D